Eucalyptus bridgesiana F. Muell. ex R.T. Baker

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus bridgesiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-bridgesiana/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Common Names

  • Apple Box

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.
flush
Coordinated growth of leaves or flowers. Such new growth is often a different colour to mature foliage.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus bridgesiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-bridgesiana/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Tree to 40 m. Bark grey to greyish brown, fibrous and flaky with white patches throughout. Branchlets green. Juvenile leaves opposite to subopposite, glaucous, orbicular to broadly obovate, crenulate, amplexicaul. Adult leaves alternate, dark green, 12–20 × 1.5–2.5 cm, lanceolate, lateral veins distinct, margins entire, apex acute to acuminate, falcate; petiole flattened or terete, 1.5–3 cm long. Inflorescences axillary and solitary; umbellasters with seven flowers. Flower buds ovoid, often apiculate; hypanthium hemispherical, 0.3–0.5 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule hemispherical, 0.4–0.7 cm diameter; valves three to four, exserted. Chippendale 1988, Hill 2004. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (Tablelands), Queensland (Stanthorpe), Victoria. Habitat Grassy woodland on drier sites. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT329.

Eucalyptus bridgesiana is a vigorous species and reasonably hardy; where happy it can make a very large tree indeed. The largest specimen recorded in the British Isles – one of a group of three at Mount Usher, Co. Wicklow – was 39.5 m tall, 130 cm dbh in 2000 (TROBI). The species has attractive white bark, and the upright new shoots flush pink before the leaves assume their usual light greenish blue as they mature, although there is some variation in foliage colour. It flowers prolifically in autumn, making it a very useful source of nectar for bees and other insects. It seems to be hardy to about –12 ºC, but will resprout as a coppice from lower temperatures that kill the top.