Eucalyptus chapmaniana Cameron

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus chapmaniana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-chapmaniana/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Common Names

  • Bogong Gum

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus chapmaniana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-chapmaniana/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Tree to 30 m. Bark greyish brown, fibrous and longitudinally fissured below; smooth and greyish white above. Branchlets yellowish orange. Juvenile leaves sessile, circular and glaucous. Adult leaves dull greyish green, 18–30 × 2.5–4 cm, lanceolate or falcate, lateral veins distinct, margins entire, apex acute; petiole terete, 1.8–3.5 cm long. Inflorescences axillary and solitary; umbellasters with three flowers. Flower buds spindle- or club-shaped; hypanthium 0.3–0.5 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule ovoid and glaucous, 0.8–1 cm diameter; valves three to four, exserted. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales, Victoria. Habitat Wet sclerophyllous forest with poor soils. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT327, NT337.

Eucalyptus chapmaniana is rare in cultivation, which is curious, especially since a specimen at Kew is one of the finest eucalypts there (14 m tall, 41 cm dbh in 2001, TROBI), and there is another at Wakehurst Place of 19 m, though this has two, thinner trunks. Both these trees were grown from seed collected in Victoria by Ken Hill in 1988 and are survivors of groups of three, the others having been killed as young plants in the winter of 1990–1991 (Kew records). The Kew specimen has made a broad, rounded crown of spreading branches and pendulous twigs, the dull dark green leaves giving it a rather sombre appearance.