Eucalyptus dalrympleana Maiden

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus dalrympleana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-dalrympleana/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • Broad-leaved Kindling Bark

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
convex
Having a rounded surface.
cordate
Heart-shaped (i.e. with two equal lobes at the base).
exserted
Protruding; pushed out.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
orbicular
Circular.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
truncate
Appearing as if cut off.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus dalrympleana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-dalrympleana/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

A tree up to 120 ft in the wild; bark smooth, shed in large patches, pale cream at first, ageing through salmon-pink to light brown. Juvenile leaves green or glaucous, opposite, sessile, broadly ovate to orbicular, more or less cordate, and sometimes stem-clasping, at the base, 134 to 214 in. long. Adult leaves stalked, lanceolate or sickle-shaped, 4 to 7 in. long, 12 to 138 in. wide. Umbels three-flowered on a slightly flattened common-stalk 18 to 14 in. long; buds almost stalkless, ovoid or cylindrical, the operculum about equal in length to the calyx-tube. Capsules hemispherical or truncate-ovoid, about 13 in. wide; disk usually convex and prominent; valves exserted.

Native of Tasmania, Victoria, and New South Wales. This beautiful and fast-growing eucalyptus is unfortunately less hardy than E. gunnii, but since it ascends to 4,500 ft on the mainland it is possible that a more reliably hardy form might be found. The tree planted by R. C. Barnard at Brimley in Devon in 1956 lost all its leaves in the winter of 1962–3 but quickly recovered and in 1966 was 44 ft high. Seeds received from Australia under the name E. dalrympleana sometimes produce E. viminalis (q.v.), but that species has such different juvenile foliage that the mistake is apparent at an early stage.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Royal Horticultural Society’s Garden, Wisley, Surrey, pl. 1960, 66 × 512 ft (1983); Hillier Arboretum, Ampfield, Hants, pl. 1959, 72 × 4 ft (1984); Mount Usher, Co. Wicklow, Eire, pl. 1945, 80 × 612 ft (1975); Ardsallagh House, Co. Tipperary, Eire, pl. 1956, 54 × 5 ft (1975).