Eucalyptus kybeanensis Maiden & Cambage

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus kybeanensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-kybeanensis/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Common Names

  • Kybean Mallee Ash

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus kybeanensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-kybeanensis/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Mallee to 6 m; rarely, tree to 18 m. Bark smooth, white, grey or greyish green throughout; shedding in ribbons. Branchlets yellowish brown. Juvenile leaves lanceolate, shiny green. Adult leaves thick, green, 5–9 × 0.6–1.3 cm, lanceolate and/or falcate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acute or hooked; petiole thick, flattened or channelled, 0.3–0.5 cm long. Inflorescences solitary and axillary; umbellasters with 3–11 flowers. Flower buds club-shaped or turbinate; hypanthium 0.3–0.4 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule hemispherical or conical, 0.5–0.8 cm diameter; valves (three to) four to five, included. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (southeast), Victoria (northeast). Habitat Exposed, high-altitude mountains, plateaus. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT325, NT342. Taxonomic note Closely related to E. approximans (see p. 330), but with sessile buds and fruits, and hardier.

Eucalyptus kybeanensis is a distinctive smaller species, with a relatively slow growth rate, and is thus more appropriate for most gardens than many of the larger, faster-growing species. Its principal distinction is conferred by the leaves, which are held stiffly horizontal or upright, contrasting with the pendulous-leaved species. It also has attractive silvery grey bark, peeling in large patches to reveal yellowish newer bark beneath. Flowering can be very abundant. In cultivation in the United Kingdom, however, it has had mixed success. There are some good specimens, the tallest recorded being one planted at the Hillier Gardens in 1986 which had reached 17 m by 2004 (TROBI), and there are leaning trees of about 12 m at Logan; but the Gum Group (2007) consider it to be a tree for sheltered situations in milder areas. It is very sensitive to lime in the soil.