Eucalyptus laophila L.A.S. Johnson & Blaxell

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus laophila' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-laophila/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus laophila' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-laophila/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Mallee to 6 m. Bark smooth and grey, greyish brown or copper throughout; shedding in ribbons. Juvenile leaves sessile, narrowly lanceolate to linear and glossy green. Adult leaves thick and glossy green, 7–13 × 1–2 cm, linear or narrowly lanceolate, falcate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acuminate or acute; petiole 0.3–1 cm long. Inflorescences solitary and axillary; umbellasters with 7–11 flowers (or more). Flower buds club- or pear-shaped; stamens white or cream. Capsule globose or urn-shaped, 0.8–1 cm diameter; valves four, included. Hill & Johnson 1991a. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (Mt. Coricudgy district, Central Tablelands). Habitat Mallee shrub on shallow, sandy soils. USDA Hardiness Zone 9. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration Johnson & Hill 1990b. Taxonomic note Considered by the EUCLID database (Brooker et al. 2002) to be synonymous with E. apiculata R.T. Baker & H.G. Sm., but distinguished by the bluish sheen and larger size of the adult leaves, and the larger fruits.

Eucalyptus laophila is a very rare species in cultivation, the only specimens located in the research for this book being at Logan where there are two small trees grown from a 1991 accession (Hind 5897). Their bark exfoliates in curling twists to leave smooth ‘skin’ below. The twiggy crowns bear narrow, willow-like leaves, and when seen in August 2006 they were heavily budded. The large fruits persist for several years. This is an interesting and attractive species that should be attempted more frequently.