Eucalyptus macrorhyncha F. Muell. ex Benth.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus macrorhyncha' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-macrorhyncha/). Accessed 2021-09-21.

Common Names

  • Red Stringybark

Glossary

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus macrorhyncha' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-macrorhyncha/). Accessed 2021-09-21.

Tree to 35 m. Bark persistent, dark brown and fibrous. Branchlets yellowish green. Juvenile leaves alternate, ovate and green. Adult leaves green, 9–18 × 1.2–2.7 cm, lanceolate, lateral veins distinct or not, margins entire, apex hooked; petiole flattened or channelled, 1–1.7 cm long. Inflorescences solitary and axillary; umbellasters with 3–11 flowers. Flower buds spindle-shaped; hypanthium 0.4–0.5 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule globular, 0.7–1.4 cm diameter; valves three to four, slightly exserted. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (east), South Australia (southeast), Victoria. Habitat Open forest near watercourses. USDA Hardiness Zone 9–10. Conservation status Not evaluated.

Eucalyptus macrorhyncha subsp. macrorhyncha has been attempted by members of the Gum Group, but has not proved satisfactory in southern England. It will survive and form a coppiced plant, but the judgement of the Group in 2007 is that it is ‘not worth the effort’.


subsp. cannonii (R.T. Baker) L.A.S. Johnson & Blaxell

Common Names
Cannon's Stringybark

Subsp. cannonii differs from subsp. macrorhyncha in that the umbellasters bear three to seven flowers (subsp. macrorhyncha has 7–11 flowers). Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (Capertee Valley). Habitat Dry, sclerophyllous forest on rocky ridges or slopes. USDA Hardiness Zone 8–9. Conservation status Not evaluated.

Cannon’s Stringybark seems to be a little hardier than the nominate subspecies, having grown at Logan since 1990. There it has made a good tree of 10 m, with three main trunks, supporting a rounded crown of greyish leaves that flush bronze and turn red as they senesce. The bark is indeed its most interesting feature, being soft, fibrous and reddish brown, rather like that of a Sequoia, peeling in longitudinal strips and fibres.