Eucalyptus mitchelliana Cambage

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus mitchelliana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-mitchelliana/). Accessed 2021-09-21.

Common Names

  • Mount Buffalo Sallee
  • Weeping Sallee

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.
flush
Coordinated growth of leaves or flowers. Such new growth is often a different colour to mature foliage.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus mitchelliana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-mitchelliana/). Accessed 2021-09-21.

Tree to 15 m. Bark smooth, greyish white, greyish brown or green. Branchlets yellow-orange. Juvenile leaves alternate, petiolate, lanceolate, dark green. Adult leaves moderately thick, 7.5–13 × 0.7–1.3 cm, lanceolate to narrowly lanceolate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acuminate or acute; petiole terete, 1–1.5 cm long. Inflorescences solitary and axillary; umbellasters with 7–11 flowers. Flower buds spindle-shaped; hypanthium 0.3–0.4 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule subglobular, 0.5–0.7 cm diameter; valves flush or included. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: Victoria (Mt. Buffalo Plateau). Habitat Among granite outcrops in open eucalypt forest. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated (IUCN), though with an extremely limited range, much of which was burnt in 2003 (J.Purse, pers. comm. 2007).

Eucalyptus mitchelliana is an attractive tree, very highly regarded by the Gum Group (2007) for its beauty and hardiness. Temperatures down to –13ºC have been measured on Mount Buffalo, and this is reflected in the record of the species in cultivation. Young trees at Lullingstone Castle were unaffected by the frost in 2005, and there are mature and often large trees in collections throughout the British Isles, including a specimen at Benmore that was 17.5 m tall in 1995, and the British and Irish champion of 28 m (51 cm dbh) in 2000 at the John F. Kennedy Arboretum, Co. Wexford (TROBI). It is relatively fast-growing when young, achieving 4 m in three years at Lullingstone, and has a pleasing weeping habit, with orange-yellow twigs bearing narrow, pendulous leaves that flush dark red.