Eucalyptus moorei Maiden & Cambage

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus moorei' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-moorei/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Glossary

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus moorei' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-moorei/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Mallee to 8 m, more rarely a tree to 10 m. Bark smooth and greyish white, shedding in ribbons. Branchlets purplish red. Juvenile leaves opposite to alternate, sessile to petiolate, lanceolate. Adult leaves thick and dull greyish green, 4–7 × 0.5–1.7 cm, lanceolate to narrowly lanceolate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acuminate or acute; petiole terete or flattened, 0.2–0.5 cm long. Inflorescences solitary and axillary; umbellasters with (7–)11–15 flowers. Flower buds spindle-shaped; hypanthium 0.1–0.3 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule subglobular, 0.3–0.4 cm diameter; valves three, included. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (Gibraltar Range, Blue Mts., Southern Tablelands). Habitat Heathland with sandy soils. USDA Hardiness Zone 8–9. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT349. Taxonomic note The closely related E. latiuscula (Blakely) L.A.S. Johnson & K.D. Hill has ovate juvenile leaves and umbellasters that are sessile (or almost so). It forms a stouter plant with fewer stems (Johnson & Hill 1990b).

Eucalyptus moorei comes from comparatively high altitudes, giving a promise of cold tolerance that is not completely fulfilled in cultivation. Seedlings show great variation in their hardiness, and even the best cannot be relied upon for long-term survival. Once established in a favourable site, however, it can develop into a good tree. A plantation made in the 1950s by the US Forestry Service in Oregon now has trees up to 10 m (S. Hogan, pers. comm. 2007), and there is a forked tree of about 10 m at Logan (from Hind 6043, accessioned 1991). This has attractive pinkish grey bark, peeling and flaking in shaggy strips from the older parts. The crown is dense, composed of graceful narrow leaves. A slightly mysterious ‘var. nana’ is in cultivation and available from seed companies. This seems to be a particularly short-growing variant, with some merit as a shrub for smaller gardens. A specimen seen at Mount Usher had attractive reddish brown stems.