Eucalyptus nova-anglica H. Deane & Maiden

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus nova-anglica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-nova-anglica/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • New England Peppermint

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus nova-anglica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-nova-anglica/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Tree to 25 m. Bark rough, fibrous and grey or blackish on the trunk and larger branches; smooth and grey or pale brown above. Branchlets red. Juvenile leaves opposite, sessile, roughly circular to cordate and glaucous. Adult leaves thick, dull or semi-glossy green, 7.5–15 × 0.7–1 cm, narrowly lanceolate to lanceolate, lateral veins distinct, margins entire, apex acuminate; petiole terete, 1.5–2.5 cm long. Inflorescences solitary and axillary; umbellasters with seven flowers. Flower buds ovoid; hypanthium 0.4 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule hemispherical to conical, sometimes glaucous, 0.4–0.5 cm diameter; valves three to four, exserted. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (northeast), Queensland (extreme southeast). Habitat Poorly drained areas on slopes and in valleys, often with heavy soils. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated.

Eucalyptus nova-anglica is regarded as being remarkably cold-tolerant considering its comparatively northern origin, and is said to be hardy to about –12 ºC (Hardy Eucalyptus Page 2004). It will resprout very vigorously if coppiced by frost (or other means). It was not damaged by the frost at Lullingstone in 2005. Growth is vigorous, trees achieving 6 m in three years in England and 10 m in four years in Oregon (Gum Group 2007). The rounded juvenile foliage is attractive and ‘fairly’ blue, changing to a duller green in the lanceolate adult phase. The only large specimen noted in the United Kingdom is at Marwood Hill, Devon, where in 2006 it was 27 m tall (21 cm dbh) (TROBI). This would seem to be a species with which to experiment more widely.