Eucalyptus risdonii Hook. f.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus risdonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-risdonii/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • Risdon Peppermint

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus risdonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-risdonii/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Shrub, mallee or tree to 8 m. Bark white, grey or yellowish, sometimes with greyish pink patches, smooth throughout. Branchlets glaucous, with characteristic scars encircling them. Juvenile leaves sessile, glaucous, initially free and elliptical, later connate and ovate. Adult leaves not often seen; green to glaucous, 6.5–10 × 1.5–2 cm, lanceolate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acuminate; petiole terete, 0.6–1.5 cm long. Inflorescences axillary and solitary; umbellasters with 7–15 flowers. Flower buds club-shaped, glaucous; hypanthium conical to pyriform, 0.2–0.3 cm wide; stamens white. Capsule hemispherical to subglobose, glaucous, 0.7–0.9 cm diameter; valves (three to) four, level or included. Brooker & Kleinig 1983, Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: Tasmania (between Risdon and Cambridge). Habitat Grows in (almost) pure stands in open shrubland. USDA Hardiness Zone 9–10. Conservation status Not evaluated.

The Gum Group (2007) consider Eucalyptus risdonii to be one of the most beautiful trees of the genus, but bemoan its tenderness – although this can vary. In the United Kingdom it will occasionally survive for a few years, the current champion being a poor 6 m individual at Marwood Hill (measured by Owen Johnson in 2006 for TROBI), but it is more useful as a potted specimen. In mild climates, such as along the southern Oregon coast (an anomalous Zone 10), it will form a good tree (S. Hogan, pers. comm. 2007).