Eucalyptus stellulata Sieber ex DC.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus stellulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-stellulata/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • Black Sallee

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus stellulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-stellulata/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Tree to 15(–20) m, or more. Bark smooth throughout or shortly fibrous below, dark grey, greyish black or olive-green. Branchlets yellowish red. Juvenile leaves sessile and opposite, though becoming petiolate, circular to ovate and green. Adult leaves thick and glossy green, 5–9 × 1.3–2.3 cm, elliptic to broadly lanceolate, lateral veins distinct, margins entire, apex acute or obtuse; petiole terete or flattened, 0.4–0.9 cm long. Inflorescences simple and axillary; umbellasters with 7–23 flowers. Flower buds spindle-shaped; hypanthium 0.2–0.3 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule globular, 0.5–0.7 cm diameter; valves three, included. Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: New South Wales (east), Victoria (east). Habitat Open woodland on flat areas between mountains and tablelands. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT360, NT361. Taxonomic note Similar to E. mitchelliana and E. moorei, but with broader leaves.

Eucalyptus stellulata has much to recommend it for temperate gardens. Not least among its favourable attributes is its cold tolerance, which is not far short of that of the hardier E. pauciflora taxa, but E. stellulata will grow in damper sites than those will tolerate (though any moisture in the soil should not be stagnant). It will tolerate seasonally boggy conditions in the United Kingdom (G. Cooper, pers. comm. 2007). As always, planting young will maximise stability, especially in slightly soft ground. The mature tree tends to be short and slightly crooked, often with a somewhat pendulous and twisted look. It is not fast-growing, one specimen at Kew planted in 1972 having reached about 15 m at the time of writing. This tree is wider than it is tall, with heavy branching from near the base, and has the dense canopy of dull green leaves associated with the species. Its most beautiful character, however, is its bark, which is basically dull dark grey but flakes in large rounded plates to leave greenish patches that give it a lovely swirly cetacean effect. There are good large specimens throughout the British Isles, the champion being one of 21 m (52 cm dbh) at Knoll Gardens, Dorset in 2006 (TROBI). As a young specimen in pots it is particularly susceptible to attack by Vine Weevil larvae (Otiorhynchus sulcatus) (T. & M. Milton, pers. comm. 2007).