Eucalyptus tenuiramis Miq.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus tenuiramis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-tenuiramis/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Common Names

  • Silver Peppermint

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Eucalyptus tenuiramis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucalyptus/eucalyptus-tenuiramis/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Tree 8–25 m, 1 m dbh. Bark whitish grey to yellow, smooth throughout. Branchlets pinkish red to white. Juvenile leaves ovate to almost circular, connate and glaucous. Adult leaves thin and greyish green or glaucous, 5.5–13 × 0.9–2.5 cm, elliptic to broadly lanceolate, lateral veins indistinct, margins entire, apex acuminate or hooked; petiole terete or angular, 0.7–1.2 cm long. Inflorescences simple and axillary; umbellasters with 11–15 flowers. Flower buds club-shaped and glaucous; hypanthium 0.3–0.4 cm wide; stamens white or cream. Capsule hemispherical to conical, glaucous, 0.6–1.1 cm diameter; valves four, flush. Boland et al. 1984, Chippendale 1988. Distribution AUSTRALIA: Tasmania (eastern and southern mainland, Flinders Is.). Habitat A component of open forest or forming pure stands on hills and in lowlands, between 0 and 450 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 9. Conservation status Not evaluated.

The weeping habit gives young trees of Eucalyptus tenuiramis a very elegant appearance, especially when the sun catches their pendulous tresses of silver leaves. As they mature, however, they straighten up and the leaves darken, so that an older specimen is not particularly exciting. The species is not very hardy – all of Tom Hart Dyke’s young trees were killed in November 2005 (pers. comm. 2007) – but once established it seems to gain some hardiness. The largest specimen in the United Kingdom is at Kew. Grown from seed collected by Ken Hill in Tasmania in 1988, this has two straight trunks from the base, and was measured at 13 m in 2001 (TROBI).