Eucryphia 'Penwith'

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Credits

Tom Christian (2018)

Recommended citation
Christian, T. (2018), 'Eucryphia 'Penwith'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucryphia/eucryphia-penwith/). Accessed 2019-09-23.

Genus

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
abaxial
(especially of surface of a leaf) Lower; facing away from the axis. (Cf. adaxial.)

References

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Credits

Tom Christian (2018)

Recommended citation
Christian, T. (2018), 'Eucryphia 'Penwith'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eucryphia/eucryphia-penwith/). Accessed 2019-09-23.

An evergreen tree to c. 10 m tall, with densely hairy young shoots.  Leaves leathery, oblong, with wavy edges and entire margins, or else with margins shallowly toothed in the upper half of the leaf, to 6.5 x 3 cm, dark green above, pale or glaucous beneath.  Leaves on vigorous young plants may occasionally be subtended by a pair of slightly smaller leaflets.  Flowers 5 – 6 cm across.  (Cullen, J. et al. (eds) (2011)).

USDA Hardiness Zone 8b-11

RHS Hardiness Rating H4

A hybrid between E. cordifolia of Chile and E. lucida of Tasmania, which arose in cultivation at Trengwainton, Cornwall, in the 1930s and exhibited in 1954. For many years this was mistakenly considered to be a selection of E. x hillieri (Bean, W.J. (1981)).

It has been described as a plant of “vigorous growth”, generally resembling E. lucida but distinguised from it by its larger, wavy-edged leaves and larger flowers (Hillier, J. & Coombes, A.J. (2002)). The Tree Register’s online database lists only two examples, the largest of which is a tree just shy of 10 m height growing at the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens under the accession number 1976.9362, although this record has not been updated since 2007 (Tree Register, The (2018)). It is commercially available from multiple sources in the UK.


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