Euodia baberi Rehd. & Wils.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Euodia baberi' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/euodia/euodia-baberi/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

Genus

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
crenate
With rounded teeth at the edge.
androdioecious
With only male or only hermaphrodite flowers on individual plants.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
obtuse
Blunt.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
pilose
Softly hairy.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Euodia baberi' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/euodia/euodia-baberi/). Accessed 2021-09-23.

A deciduous dioecious tree to about 50 ft high; one-year-old shoots glabrous, dark purple. Leaves odd-pinnate with one to four pairs of shortly stalked leaflets, which are 3 to 6 in. long, 138 to 3 in. wide, mostly oblong-ovate or oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, entire or finely crenate, with ten to fifteen pairs of veins, glabrous except for the pilose midrib and lateral veins beneath; petiole 1 to 2 in. long, it and the rachis pilose. Male flowers in pyramidal panicles 312 to 5 in. long and 4 to 8 in. wide; petals five, white; inflorescence axes rusty-pilose. Fruits reddish, warted, about 38 in. wide, obtuse (not beaked) at the apex.

This species was discovered by Wilson in 1904 on Mount Omei in western Szechwan, but was apparently not introduced until seeds were collected by Roy Lancaster on the mountain in 1980 (L.594). Wilson also found it in other parts of western Szechwan. It has already flowered in cultivation.