Euonymus wilsonii Sprague

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Euonymus wilsonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/euonymus/euonymus-wilsonii/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
aril
Fleshy outgrowth produced at the base of a seed (as in e.g. Taxus). Often acts to attract animal seed-dispersal agents.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
lax
Loose or open.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Euonymus wilsonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/euonymus/euonymus-wilsonii/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

An evergreen shrub up to 20 ft high, of lax or scandent habit, quite free from down in leaf and twig; young shoots slender. Leaves 3 to 6 in. long, 1 to 134 in. wide, lanceolate, wedge-shaped at the base, gradually tapered at the apex to a long slender point; shallowly and rather distinctly toothed; conspicuously veined beneath; stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Fruits four-lobed, borne on a main-stalk 112 in. long; they are clothed with conspicuous, awl-shaped spines 15 in. long, and are altogether about 34 in. across; aril yellow.

Introduced from Mt Omei in W. China by Wilson in 1904, and now growing vigorously in the collection at Kew. It is distinct from cultivated spindle-trees in the remarkable hedgehog-like fruits.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

† E. echinatus Wall. – This native of the Himalaya as far west as Kashmir is, like E. wilsonii, a climbing species with prickly fruits. In cultivation by 1827, it is figured in Bot. Mag., t.2767, but is now rare in cultivation.