Eupatorium ligustrinum DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Eupatorium ligustrinum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eupatorium/eupatorium-ligustrinum/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Synonyms

  • E. micranthum Lessing
  • E. weinmannianum Reg. & Koern.
  • Ageratina ligustrina (DC.) R. M. King & H. Robinson

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    inflorescence
    Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
    involucre
    A ring of bracts surrounding an inflorescence.
    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Eupatorium ligustrinum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eupatorium/eupatorium-ligustrinum/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

    An evergreen bush of dense growth and hemispherical shape, as much as 9 ft high and wide, the whole of the plant free from down except the flower-stalk and the scales of the involucre. Young shoots slender, slightly angular, often purplish on the sunny side. Leaves opposite, elliptical to elliptical-lanceolate, sometimes inclined to obovate, mostly pointed, tapered at the base, shallowly or indistinctly toothed on the terminal half, 2 to 4 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, pale bright green; stalk 14 to 58 in. long. Inflorescence a branching, flattish, rounded cluster of corymbs up to 8 in. wide. Flower-heads 14 in. wide, each composed of six to ten florets surrounded at the base by an involucre of linear, downy scales. Florets tubular, 14 in. long, creamy-white, sometimes slightly rose-tinted, charmingly fragrant, the bi-lobed stigmas much exposed.

    Native of E. Mexico from Tamaulipas to Chiapas; and of Guatemala and Costa Rica. In gardens, where it is better known under one or other of the synonyms given above, it is most commonly grown as a pot plant, with greenhouse protection except during the summer. It is, however, hardy enough to be grown outdoors in the mildest parts; a plant at Logan in Wigtownshire has attained a height of 8 ft and a spread of 12 ft. A 6 ft plant at Belhaven House, E. Lothian, flowers throughout the winter and stood 120 of frost.