Euptelea

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Euptelea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/euptelea/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Family

  • Eupteleaceae

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
samara
Dry indehiscent winged fruit usually with a single seed (as in e.g. Acer Fraxinus Ulmus. Also called a ‘key fruit’.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Euptelea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/euptelea/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

A genus of two species – from N. India, Burma, China, and Japan. They are trees with conspicuously toothed, long-stalked leaves, and remarkable flowers of no beauty; they have no sepals or petals. Stamens numerous; pistils stalked, six to eighteen in number, each developing into a curious flat samara, rather resembling that of the elm, but wedge-shaped, and tapering gradually from a rounded apex to a slender stalk. The Japanese species, and the Chinese form of E. pleiosperma, are both quite hardy, of graceful form, and give good colour effects in autumn. Increased by layers or seed.

The eupteleas are of considerable botanical interest in belonging to an anomalous group including Cercidiphyllum, Eucommia, Tetracentron, and Trochodendron, whose true place in the vegetable kingdom is variously estimated. The view followed here is that it should rank as a monotypic family (Nast and Bailey, Journ. Arn. Arb., Vol. 27, pp. 186-192, and Smith, ibid., pp. 175-185). Dr Hutchinson places Euptelea in the family Trochodendraceae.