Eurya japonica Thunb.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Eurya japonica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eurya/eurya-japonica/). Accessed 2021-09-21.

Genus

Synonyms

  • E. pusilla Sieb.

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Eurya japonica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/eurya/eurya-japonica/). Accessed 2021-09-21.

    A dwarf evergreen shrub, with alternate, dark, glossy green leaves, which are 112 to 3 in. long, oval or obovate, toothed, blunt at the apex, quite glabrous (like the twigs), shortly stalked. Flowers unisexual, very small and inconspicuous, white, produced singly or in twos or threes from the axils of the leaves; each flower 18 in. across on a stalk about as long. Fruit black, and as large as a peppercorn. Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 588.

    At Kew this little shrub is hardy when once thoroughly established, but is sometimes injured by severe frost when young. It is easily increased by cuttings. What is considered by botanists to be the same species is found not only in China and Japan but in the mountains of N. and S. India, Ceylon, the Malay Archipelago, even as far east as Fiji. In these places, even in Japan, it sometimes becomes a small tree 30 ft high, but the form cultivated in Britain is quite a dwarf and slow-growing bush, and is perhaps the most northerly and hardiest form. It is evidently the plant distinguished as E. pusilla by Siebold, who gave several forms of this eurya specific rank. It is an interesting ally of the tea plant, and a neat little evergreen.