Exochorda korolkowii Lav.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Exochorda korolkowii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/exochorda/exochorda-korolkowii/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

Genus

Synonyms

  • E. albertii Reg.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Exochorda korolkowii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/exochorda/exochorda-korolkowii/). Accessed 2021-09-20.

A deciduous shrub of sturdy, erect habit up to 12 or 15 ft high, with erect branches; branchlets glabrous. Leaves obovate, glabrous, those of the sterile shoots 112 to 312 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, toothed towards the apex, which is pointed, the base tapering to a short stalk, occasionally with two deep, narrow lobes there; leaves of the flowering twigs much smaller, 12 to 34 in. wide, not toothed. Flowers pure white, about 112 in. across, in erect racemes 3 to 4 in. long; stamens in five groups of five each. Fruit composed of five flattened, two-edged divisions, each 12 to 34 in. long, arranged starwise. Flowers in May.

Native of Turkestan, where it was discovered in the eastern part of Bokhara by Albert Regel, at altitudes of 4,000 to 6,000 ft. It is very hardy, and more robust in habit than E. racemosa, from which it differs in the greater number of stamens, in the smaller flowers, and larger fruits. The plant became generally known in cultivation in 1886 through Prof. Regel of St Petersburg, but it had previously been grown as E. korolkowii at the Segrez Arboretum in France by Lavallée, who sent it to Kew in 1881 under that name.