Fontanesia phillyreoides Labill.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fontanesia phillyreoides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fontanesia/fontanesia-phillyreoides/). Accessed 2020-09-22.

Genus

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

Glossary

herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fontanesia phillyreoides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fontanesia/fontanesia-phillyreoides/). Accessed 2020-09-22.

A privet-like, deciduous shrub up to 20 ft high, forming a great number of slender twigs, angular and glabrous when young. Leaves greyish green, ovate-lanceolate, oval, or oblong, 12 to 212 in. long, 14 to 58 in. wide, usually with a tapering point, entire, glabrous. Flowers about 18 in. long, greenish white, very numerous on terminal panicles 12 to 1 in. long, supplemented by smaller clusters in the leaf-axils, produced during June on leafy twigs. A prominent feature of the flower is the protruded stamens. Fruit a flat disk, roundish or oblong, 14 to 38 in. long, surrounded by a membranous wing.

Native of the Near East (Cilicia, Syria, etc.); introduced in 1787. This shrub retains its leaves long in the autumn. It is perfectly hardy and flowers copiously, and has about the same decorative value as the privet. It has been stated that the margins of the leaves in this species are rough to the touch and that this character helps to distinguish it from F. fortunei. But this character is dubious, and not apparent on most of the specimens in the Kew Herbarium.


'Nana'

A form of more compact habit and slower growth.

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