Fraxinus anomala Torr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fraxinus anomala' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fraxinus/fraxinus-anomala/). Accessed 2020-02-17.

Genus

Common Names

  • Utah Ash

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lax
Loose or open.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fraxinus anomala' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fraxinus/fraxinus-anomala/). Accessed 2020-02-17.

A tree 18 to 20 ft high, with glabrous, square, slightly winged, slender young shoots. Leaves simple (rarely with two or three leaflets), ovate, sometimes roundish or obovate, tapered at the base, bluntish or pointed at the apex, inconspicuously toothed, 1 to 212 in. long, 34 to 134 in. wide, grey-green, glabrous on both surfaces; stalk 12 to 1 in. long. It flowers on the previous year’s growths, and the fruits are 23 in. long, obovate or oval.

Native of Colorado, Utah, and Nevada; said by Sargent to be not rare. Introduced in 1893 to Kew, where it formed a lax-branched, small tree, quite distinct from every other cultivated ash in the combination of square stems and simple leaves, but only worth growing as a curiosity. It is no longer in the Kew collection.


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