Fraxinus quadrangulata Michx.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fraxinus quadrangulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fraxinus/fraxinus-quadrangulata/). Accessed 2020-02-17.

Genus

Common Names

  • Blue Ash

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Fraxinus quadrangulata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/fraxinus/fraxinus-quadrangulata/). Accessed 2020-02-17.

A tree 60 to 70, occasionally over 100 ft high; branchlets square and distinctly four-winged, not downy; bark of the trunk covered with loose plates. Leaves 7 to 14 in. long, with five to eleven leaflets, which are ovate to lanceolate, 3 to 5 in. long, 1 to 2 in. wide, rounded or broadly wedge-shaped and unequal at the base, tapering at the apex to a long, slender point, sharply toothed, yellowish green and glabrous above, paler and downy beneath, especially about the midrib and veins. Common stalk minutely downy, and grooved on the upper side; stalks of leaflets 18 to 14 in. long. Flowers in short panicles from the previous year’s wood, calyx minute, soon deciduous. Fruit, 112 in. long, 516 in. wide, oblong, with a notch at the apex.

Native of the south-eastern and central United States; introduced in 1823. It produces a valuable timber in the United States, but does not seem to have ever attained any great size in this country. There is a small specimen in the Ash collection at Kew. It is readily distinguished from all ashes with the same number of leaflets by its square, winged branchlets, except F. griffithii, and that has untoothed leaflets, and belongs to the Ornus section.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

The Kew specimen, pl. 1910, is 35 × 214 ft (1977).


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