Hoheria 'Stardust'

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Sponsor

Kindly sponsored by
a member of the International Dendrology Society

Credits

Julian Sutton

Recommended citation
Sutton, J., 'Hoheria 'Stardust'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/hoheria/hoheria-stardust/). Accessed 2021-12-04.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Hoheria sexstylosa 'Stardust'

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

Credits

Julian Sutton

Recommended citation
Sutton, J., 'Hoheria 'Stardust'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/hoheria/hoheria-stardust/). Accessed 2021-12-04.

Branchlets purplish, mealy when young but with almost no stellate hairs. Leaves lacking stellate hairs, shiny green above, paler beneath; ovate, 5–8 × 2–3.5 cm; margin serrate, teeth small, forward pointing; base rather abruptly tapered; apex acute; petiole mealy, stiff, not lax. Flowers 2–3 cm across, in clusters of (1–)2–3; petals white, elliptic, notched on one side, not overlapping when fully open. Sepals reflexed even in recently opened flowers. Styles and stigmas purple. Carpels 5–7, with spreading wings in fruit, the wings not purplish when young. (Hutchins 2006; pers. obs. 2021)

USDA Hardiness Zone 8-10

RHS Hardiness Rating H4

Awards AGM

A small, upright, evergreen tree, flowering freely from an early age in July–August, and widely offered in the British nursery trade. Named by Roy Lancaster from a tree at Cadland Estate, Hampshire, which had been received as a seedling from Colonsay House, W Scotland in the early 1980s (Lancaster 1994; Edwards & Marshall 2019). Usually listed as a cultivar of H. sexstylosa, Hutchins (2006) felt it was very distinct and perhaps a hybrid; the preponderance of hybrid seedlings in British gardens makes a species attribution seem rash.