Hypericum coris L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Hypericum coris' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/hypericum/hypericum-coris/). Accessed 2019-12-14.

Genus

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
linear
Strap-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
revolute
Rolled downwards at margin.
whorl
Arrangement of three or more organs (leaves flowers) around a central axis. whorled Arranged in a whorl.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Hypericum coris' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/hypericum/hypericum-coris/). Accessed 2019-12-14.

An evergreen, semi-shrubby plant, erect and 6 to 15 in. high, or sometimes procumbent; stems round, very slender and clustered, glabrous. Leaves in whorls of four, rarely three, linear, 13 to 1 in. long, 116 in. or less wide, stalkless, revolute, blunt; midrib prominent beneath. Flowers borne in axillary clusters of three to five, forming terminal panicles 2 to 5 in. long. Corolla 34 in. wide, glowing yellow; petals ovate-oblong; sepals linear-oblong, about 15 in. long, margined with dark, stalked or stalkless glands; stamens in three bundles. Blossoms in June and July. Bot. Mag., t. 6563.

Native mainly of the northern Appenines, Maritime Alps and southern Alps; cultivated in 1640. It is related to H. empetrifolium, which has angled stems and fewer, usually three, leaves in a whorl, and petals which fall before the fruits are ripe. H. coris is a lime-loving plant and needs a sunny position, in well-drained soil.


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