Hypericum subsessile N. Robson

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Hypericum subsessile' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/hypericum/hypericum-subsessile/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

Genus

Glossary

inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
acute
Sharply pointed.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
apiculate
With a short sharp point.
bud
Immature shoot protected by scales that develops into leaves and/or flowers.
cuneate
Wedge-shaped.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
reflexed
Folded backwards.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
terete
Like a slender tapering cylinder.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Hypericum subsessile' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/hypericum/hypericum-subsessile/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

A shrub 3 to 4 ft high; stems red, terete when mature. Leaves almost sessile, narrowly elliptic to oblong, 138 to 212 in. long and up to about 34 in. wide, acute to rounded and apiculate at the apex, cuneate at the base; petiole very short. Inflorescence with up to eight flowers, which are shallowly cup-shaped and 138 to 134 in. wide. Sepals leafy, outwardly curved in bud, reflexed in fruit. Petals bright yellow, tinged red on the back, about 38 in. wide, with an acute apiculus near the apex. Stamens about three-quarters as long as the petals, with yellow anthers. Styles outcurved below the apex, slightly shorter than the ovary.

A rare species in the wild, described in 1985 from a specimen collected by Forrest in the Tali range (Cangshan) in 1929 and introduced from the same locality in 1981 (SBEC 127 and 551). It is near to the more widely distributed H. acmosepalum, and is also related to H. mysurense of India and Sri Lanka (Robson, op. cit. (1985), p. 239).


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