Jamesia americana Torr. & Gr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Jamesia americana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/jamesia/jamesia-americana/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

Genus

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    acute
    Sharply pointed.
    capsule
    Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Jamesia americana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/jamesia/jamesia-americana/). Accessed 2021-12-02.

    A deciduous shrub 4 to 7 ft high, of bushy, rounded habit, and usually more in diameter than it is high; branches stout, stiff, very pithy, covered with a bright brown, downy bark, which afterwards peels off in papery flakes. Leaves opposite, on the barren shoots ovate, 1 to 3 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, coarsely and regularly toothed, with scattered, flattened hairs above, downy, almost felted beneath; on the flowering twigs the leaves are much smaller, and often of more oval outline; stalk downy, 14 to 34 in. long. Flowers slightly fragrant, pure white, 12 in. across, produced during May in erect, terminal pyramidal panicles 1 to 212 in. long and broad. Petals five, oblong. Calyx woolly, with five ovate acute lobes. Stamens ten. Styles three to five, united only at the base. Fruit a capsule. Bot. Mag., t. 6142.

    Native of western North America; introduced to Kew in 1862. This interesting and pretty shrub can be propagated by cuttings and, given a sunny position, and an open, not too rich soil, thrives excellently. A plant with pink flowers, found by Purpus in Nevada, has been named f. rosea (Rehd.) Rehd.