Juglans microcarpa Berl.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Julian Sutton (2019)

Recommended citation
'Juglans microcarpa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/juglans/juglans-microcarpa/). Accessed 2019-11-18.

Genus

Common Names

  • Texan Walnut

Synonyms

  • J. rupestris Engelm.
  • J. nana Engelm.

Glossary

nut
Dry indehiscent single-seeded fruit with woody outer wall.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Julian Sutton (2019)

Recommended citation
'Juglans microcarpa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/juglans/juglans-microcarpa/). Accessed 2019-11-18.

A small tree, often semi-shrubby; young shoots covered with short, yellowish down. Leaves 6 to 12 in. long; leaflets thirteen to over twenty, lance-shaped or narrowly ovate, 1 to 3 in. long, 14 to 34 in. wide, long and taper-pointed, finely toothed, obliquely rounded at the base; when young both surfaces are covered with minute down, which mostly falls away except on the midrib and chief veins; common stalk downy like the young shoots. Male catkins slender, 2 to 4 in. long. Fruits globose, 12 to 1 in. in diameter, covered with a thin, smooth husk. Nut deeply grooved.

Native of central and western Texas, western Oklahoma, south-eastern New Mexico, and parts of Arizona; also of northern Mexico; it was discovered by Berlandier in 1835 and described by him under the above name in 1850 (the more familiar name J. rupestris was published in 1853). It was sent to Kew by Prof. Sargent in 1881 and again in 1894. It is a handsome bushy tree, quite distinct from all other cultivated walnuts in its small, narrow, thin leaflets.

A very handsome specimen grows in the University Botanic Garden, Cambridge; planted in 1923 it measures 36 × 334 ft (1969).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Borde Hill, Sussex, North Park, 52 × 514 ft (1974); University Botanic Garden, Cambridge, 50 × 5 ft (1984); Talbot Manor, Norfolk, pl. 1960, 42 × 314 ft (1978).


var. major

**Delete on publication**

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society through the support of the Dendrology Charitable Company.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.