Magnolia compressa Maxim.

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Magnolia compressa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/magnolia/magnolia-compressa/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Michelia compressa (Maxim.) Sarg.

Glossary

cone
Term used here primarily to indicate the seed-bearing (female) structure of a conifer (‘conifer’ = ‘cone-producer’); otherwise known as a strobilus. A number of flowering plants produce cone-like seed-bearing structures including Betulaceae and Casuarinaceae.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Magnolia compressa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/magnolia/magnolia-compressa/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

This article appeared in Bean as Michelia compressa

An evergreen tree, at least 40 ft high, with a trunk 1 ft or more in diameter, and a compact, rounded head of branches. Leaves 3 in. in average length, oblong or obovate, tapering at the base to a slender stalk 12 to 1 in. long; glabrous, leathery, and glossy green. Flowers (rarely seen in this country) 112 to 2 in. across when fully expanded, magnolia-like, fragrant; sepals and petals pale yellow. Fruits on a cone 2 in. long, each containing usually three seeds.

Native of southern Japan and the Ryukyu Islands; introduced in 1894. It was cultivated at Kew for some years and proved hardy though slow-growing. A plant of this rare species grew for some forty years at Borde Hill in Sussex, with the protection of a south-facing wall, but its flowers, though quite freely borne, made little display.