Magnolia × foggii Figlar

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Credits

Julian Sutton (2022)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. (2022), 'Magnolia × foggii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/magnolia/magnolia-x-foggii/). Accessed 2022-07-01.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Michelia × foggii Savage nom. nud.

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

Credits

Julian Sutton (2022)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. (2022), 'Magnolia × foggii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/magnolia/magnolia-x-foggii/). Accessed 2022-07-01.

Tree to 20 m. Leaves thin and leathery, 10–18 × 4–6 cm, elliptic, upper surface glossy green and glabrous, lower surface pale green with sparse rufous pubescence. Flowers on axillary shoots, fragrant, white to cream or with pink edges, 10–13 cm diameter; stamens yellow. (Figlar 2000).

USDA Hardiness Zone 7b-9

RHS Hardiness Rating H4

This artificial hybrid is the result of a cross between Magnolia figo and M. doltsopa first made in 1972 by John M. Fogg, a magnolia enthusiast and one-time Director of the Morris Arboretum, Philadelphia; all hybrids involving only these two parents are covered by the name. Flowering from a young age (Figlar 2005) it combines the good qualities of its parents to make erect, vigorous handsome shrubs up to over 10 m tall in some clones, with dense dark foliage, widely used for landscaping purposes in the southern United States, and even recommended for hedging (Virtual Plant Tags 2008). A number of clones have been selected. Some (e.g. ‘Picotee’) are less hardy than others listed here (K. Hughes, pers. comm. 2008).

Along with M. laevifolia, M. × foggii has been used in Mark Jury’s breeding program for commercial michelia hybrids; these are already eclipsing M. × foggii as plants for general garden use.


'Allspice'

Large, pure white flowers with strong fragrance. Raised by Phil Savage, Detroit, before 1991.


'Bubbles'

Small pyramidal tree; flowers white with pale pink margins, slightly fragrant. Raised before 2000 by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand, and quite widely grown in Australasia; its hardiness has scarcely been tested in Europe or North America.


'Jack Fogg'

Narrowly upright large shrub or small tree. Tepals white, edged purple-pink. Suffers little damage even at –18 °C in the southeastern United States (Hogan 2008). A specimen planted in Dorset, UK by John Gallagher before 1992, had reached 11–12 m by 2007 and was still growing well, flowering abundantly each year and never damaged by frost (J. Gallagher, pers. comm. 2007). Raised by Phil Savage, Detroit, before 1991.


'Mixed up Miss'

Small pyramidal tree; flowers creamy white edged and tipped purplish. Raised before 1996 by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand; again, hardiness scarcely tested outside Australasia.