Magnolia × foggii Figlar

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
Trees and Shrubs Online,

Magnolia × foggii

, accessed on 24-5-2019

Genus

Synonyms

  • Michelia × foggii Savage
  • nom. nud.

Glossary

clone
Organism arising via vegetative or asexual reproduction.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
Trees and Shrubs Online,

Magnolia × foggii

, accessed on 24-5-2019

Tree to 20 m. Leaves thin and leathery, 10–18 × 4–6 cm, elliptic, upper surface glossy green and glabrous, lower surface pale green with sparse rufous pubescence. Flowers on axillary shoots, fragrant, white to cream or with pink edges, 10–13 cm diameter; stamens yellow. Figlar 2000. Distribution In cultivation only. USDA Hardiness Zone 7b. Illustration Liu et al. 2004; NT490.

Nomenclatural novelty

Magnolia ×foggii Figlar nothosp. nov.

Magnolia ×foggii Figlar, Proc. Internat. Symp. Fam. Magnoliac. 1998: 21–22, 2000, nom. inval., no holotype cited (Art. 37.1). Holotypus: USA: North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina State University Arboretum (now JC Raulston Arboretum), Alice B. Russell 127, 5 April 1994 (NCSC).

This artificial hybrid is the result of a cross between Magnolia figo and M. doltsopa made in 1972 by John M. Fogg, a magnolia enthusiast and one-time Director of the Morris Arboretum. It combines the good qualities of its parents to make erect, vigorous handsome shrubs up to 6 m tall (potentially taller) with dense dark foliage, widely used for landscaping purposes in the southern United States, and even recommended for hedging (Virtual Plant Tags 2008). A number of clones have been selected and named, of which probably the best known are ‘Allspice’, with large pure white flowers and very strong fragrance, and ‘Jack Fogg’, with medium to large flowers, the tepals white with a purple edge. A tree of ‘Jack Fogg’ planted by John Gallagher over 15 years ago in Dorset is 11–12 m tall, still growing well, and flowers abundantly each year. This individual has never been damaged by frost (J. Gallagher, pers. comm. 2007), and the cultivar is reported to suffer little damage even at –18 °C in the southeastern United States (Hogan 2008). Hardiness differs between clones, however, and ‘Picotee’ is less hardy than the two mentioned above (K. Hughes, pers. comm. 2008). As its name suggests, this latter clone also has white tepals edged with reddish purple.

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