Magnolia × pruhoniciana Jakl

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Credits

Julian Sutton (2022)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. (2022), 'Magnolia × pruhoniciana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/magnolia/magnolia-x-pruhoniciana/). Accessed 2022-12-04.

Genus

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

F2
The second generation of progeny from an original hybridisation event; derivatives from the generation.
stamen
Male reproductive organ of flower. Usually composed of an anther and a filament.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

Credits

Julian Sutton (2022)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. (2022), 'Magnolia × pruhoniciana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/magnolia/magnolia-x-pruhoniciana/). Accessed 2022-12-04.

USDA Hardiness Zone 7-9

RHS Hardiness Rating H5

This name covers all hybrids between Magnolia obovata and M. tripetala, including F2 and subsequent generations, as well as backcrosses to either parent. Known only from gardens, it has originated spontaneously at the Arnold Arboretum, MA (see ‘Silver Parasol’ below), and through controlled crosses made by Viktor Keskevič at Průhonice Park, Czechia, before 1952 (Jakl 2013; Spongberg & Weaver 1981) as well as later breeders. F2 seedlings have arisen at Průhonice; material has been distributed to other Czech and Belgian collections.

These hybrids are decidous, medium trees, with elliptic to ovate leaves of 20–45 × 10–22 cm, in false whorls. Flowers are white, 16–25 cm across, held erect at the ends of branches, with 11–12(–15) tepals, the outer three brownish-pink, reddish filaments and pink stigmas. They can most reliably be distinguished from the parents by their intermediate fruit characters as shown in the table (Jakl 2013):

Follicles Stamen scars
M. obovata (108–)130–163(–209 (143–)169–195(–214)
M. × pruhoniciana (58–)91–107(–145) (92–)113–148(–159)
M. tripetala (24–)51–63(–79) (65–)76– 89(–114)

'Silk Road'

Flowers moderately fragrant; tepals white, narrow. A backcross with M. tripetala by Dennis Ledvina, WI; a parent of the intersectional hybrid ‘Melissa Parris’.


'Silver Parasol'

Flowers in late spring to early summer (late May to June, Massachusetts), 20–25 cm across, sweetly fragrant; leaves only slightly glaucous beneath. Raised from seed of M. obovata at the Arnold Arboretum, and labelled as such until its hybridity was recognized; a probable sister seedling was found at Hunnewell Estate, MA (Spongberg & Weaver 1981).