Mahonia arguta Hutch.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Mahonia arguta' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/mahonia/mahonia-arguta/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

Genus

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Mahonia arguta' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/mahonia/mahonia-arguta/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

An evergreen shrub 4 to 5 ft high, glabrous in all its parts; young shoots purplish. Leaves pinnate, up to 1 ft long, made up of from nine to thirteen leaflets, which are lanceolate, pointed, spine-tipped, wedge-shaped at the base, entire or with a few sharp teeth, stalkless or nearly so, 1 to 312 in. long, 14 to 34 in. wide, dark dull green, conspicuously net-veined, of stiff hard texture. Flowers 34 in. wide, pale yellow, borne in May on the uppermost two-thirds of slender, arching panicles 12 to 16 in. long; two to four flowers are carried by each of the branches of the panicle on which they are thinly disposed. Fruits globose, 14 to 13 in. wide, dark blue. Bot. Mag., t. 8266.

This very distinct mahonia is probably a native of Mexico, but it is only known by a plant growing in the Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, and its progeny. The history of this plant is not known, but it has been cultivated there (with protection in winter) for over fifty years. It will probably be hardy only in our milder maritime counties. The long slender panicle, with its pale yellow, thinly set flowers, is quite attractive.