Mahonia fremontii (Torr.) Fedde

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Mahonia fremontii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/mahonia/mahonia-fremontii/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Berberis fremontii Torr.

Glossary

glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
leaflet
Leaf-like segment of a compound leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Mahonia fremontii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/mahonia/mahonia-fremontii/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

An evergreen shrub 3 to 12 ft high, with pinnate leaves composed of five or seven leaflets of a vividly glaucous colour. Leaflets 34 to 114 in. long, spine-tipped, and with one or more spiny teeth at each side, the terminal leaflet is stalked and ovate to lanceolate, the others sessile and shorter. Flowers yellow, and produced four to eight together towards the end of a raceme 2 to 3 in. in length, each flower on a slender stalk 12 to 34 in. long. Fruits blue, becoming dry and inflated at maturity, enclosing six to eight seeds.

Native of the hot, dry, south-western United States (Texas, Arizona, etc.). This striking and handsome species may be grown on a south wall, and, wherever cultivated, should be given the sunniest position available. The only species in cultivation likely to be confused with this is M. trifoliolata, which has leaflets of the same form and (in var. glauca) very glaucous hue, but only three of them to each leaf.