Malus Rosybloom Cultivars

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Sponsor

Kindly sponsored by
Francine von Finck: after many informative Tours and Study Days with the I.D.S I feel it only fitting to help and promote such a wonderful organisation.

Credits

Julian Sutton (species), Nick Dunn (cultivars)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. & Dunn, N., 'Malus Rosybloom Cultivars' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/malus/malus-rosybloom-cultivars/). Accessed 2021-05-11.

Genus

Glossary

Credits

Julian Sutton (species), Nick Dunn (cultivars)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. & Dunn, N., 'Malus Rosybloom Cultivars' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/malus/malus-rosybloom-cultivars/). Accessed 2021-05-11.

This is a gardeners’ and plant breeders’ grouping, well-defined at its centre but rather fuzzy at the margins, for some ornamental hybrids of M. sieversii f. niedzwetzkyana, especially with M. baccata. Intensely coloured flowers are a sine qua non; heavily pigmented leaves, large flowers and severe scab susceptibility are very common, but not universal features. Hybrids of this sort made in the early decades of the 20th century by Nils Hansen at the State Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings, SD, and by Isabella Preston of the Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Ontario are consistently placed here (Fiala 1994). We describe Hansens’s ‘Hopa’, and Preston’s ‘Cowichan’, ‘Makamik’ and ‘Simcoe’. Later hybrids with similar characteristics (e.g. ‘Almey’, ‘Royalty’, ‘Rudolph’ and M. × moerlandsii cultivars such as ‘Liset’ and ‘Profusion’) are sometimes also referred to as rosyblooms, but it is not really clear where the term should end.