Malus × astracanica Dumont de Courset

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Credits

Julian Sutton (species), Nick Dunn (cultivars)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. & Dunn, N., 'Malus × astracanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/malus/malus-x-astracanica/). Accessed 2021-07-30.

Genus

Glossary

Credits

Julian Sutton (species), Nick Dunn (cultivars)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. & Dunn, N., 'Malus × astracanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/malus/malus-x-astracanica/). Accessed 2021-07-30.

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-8

RHS Hardiness Rating H6

Conservation status Not evaluated (NE)

An old binomial applied to the astrachan (or astrakhan) apples, old forms of M. domestica showing putative influence from M. prunifolia in their more deeply toothed leaves, and in their long-stalked, often bloomy fruits. Two types are known, usually referred to by common names which are sometimes elevated to cultivar status. The White Astracan was introduced to western Europe from Russia around the mid-18th century; its fruits are pale, translucent yellow. The Red Astracan has bright red, bloomy fruits (Bean 1981). Both have been significant as very hardy domestic/orchard cooking apples in the northern United States into the 20th century, especially the Red, and are still available today (St Lawrence Nurseries 2020).

As ornamentals, Fiala (1994) dismisses them as irrelevant. Specimens labelled M. × astracanica dating from the 1950s can be seen at the US National Arboretum, Washington DC, and the Arnold Arboretum, MA (US National Arboretum 2020; Arnold Arboretum 2020).