Melicytus ramiflorus J. R. & G. Forst.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Melicytus ramiflorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/melicytus/melicytus-ramiflorus/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

Genus

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    berry
    Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    globose
    globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Melicytus ramiflorus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/melicytus/melicytus-ramiflorus/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

    A deciduous shrub or small tree up to 30 ft high, with glabrous young shoots and leaves. Leaves alternate, oblong-lanceolate, tapered towards both ends, coarsely toothed, 2 to 6 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, bright dark green above; stalk 13 to 34 in. long. Flowers small, produced in June in clusters of three to nine from the joints of the previous season’s growth; each flower about 15 in. wide, yellowish green, on a stalk 15 to 25 in. long. Petals five, triangular. Fruit a globose berry, 15 in. wide, violet-blue, very abundant.

    Native of New Zealand; long cultivated in the Temperate House at Kew, where a plant flowers but does not bear fruits. As, however, the species is usually, if not always, unisexual, both male and female plants will be necessary to obtain them. The greatest success with it in this country probably has been achieved by the late Canon Boscawen at Ludgvan Rectory, near Penzance, in whose garden it stood ten degrees of frost without injury, and in May 1930 was 20 ft high and wide. He sent to Kew some beautiful sprays covered with fruit in November 1917, which had been gathered from his plants raised ten years before from New Zealand seed.