Meliosma myriantha Sieb. & Zucc.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Meliosma myriantha' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/meliosma/meliosma-myriantha/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

Genus

Glossary

lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Meliosma myriantha' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/meliosma/meliosma-myriantha/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

A deciduous shrub or small tree of spreading habit, 20 ft high. Leaves simple, oval-lanceolate, 3 to 8 in. long, 112 to 3 in. wide, shortly pointed, sharply and regularly toothed, the stalk (12 to 1 in. long) and midrib covered with reddish-brown hairs, veins parallel, as in a sweet chestnut. Panicles terminal, 6 in. or more long, and about the same wide, much branched; the main-stalk and all its ramifications covered with brown hairs. Flowers minute, about 18 in. diameter, very numerous, yellowish white, very fragrant. Fruit crowded in a broad panicle, each one about the size of a peppercorn, dark red.

Native of Japan and the Korean Archipelago; introduced from the former to the Coombe Wood nursery in 1879 by Maries. The original plant, now unfortunately no longer at Kew, was a fine spreading bush about 8 ft high and 12 ft through, and flowered with freedom every year in late June and July. It is, nevertheless, a rather tender subject when young; plants unprotected in the open at Kew have often perished. When once a strong woody base has been formed it will probably survive, but until then some winter protection is necessary.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

As mentioned in the second printing, there is a good specimen of this species at Wakehurst Place, Sussex, by the Mansion Pond.