Microglossa albescens (DC.) C. B. Cl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Microglossa albescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/microglossa/microglossa-albescens/). Accessed 2021-11-29.

Synonyms

  • Aster Albescens (DC.) Hand.-Mazz.
  • Amphiraphis albescens DC.
  • Aster cabulicus Lindl.

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    compound
    Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
    entire
    With an unbroken margin.
    indeterminate
    A form of inflorescence in which the outer or lower flowers open first and the inflorescence axis continues to grow. (Cf. determinate.)

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Microglossa albescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/microglossa/microglossa-albescens/). Accessed 2021-11-29.

    A plant with semi-woody, erect stems, growing in tufts about 3 ft high, very pithy, and clothed with a grey down. Leaves alternate, lance-shaped, 2 to 5 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, tapered to both ends, the margins entire or with minute teeth, grey and downy beneath. Flower-heads 13 in. in diameter, produced during July, in compound corymbs 3 to 6 in. across, terminating the current season’s growth. Ray-florets about fourteen, narrow, pale lilac-blue or bluish white; disk-flowers yellow.

    Native of the Himalaya, up to 12,000 ft; introduced to the Chiswick gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society about 1840. The shoots made during the summer die back considerably during the winter, almost to the ground in severe seasons. The flowers are of a rather indeterminate blue, and the plant has no particular merit except in flowering in late summer. Propagated by cuttings of the young growths in heat, or by dividing old plants.