Morus 'Black Tabor'

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Credits

Tom Christian & Peter Coles (2022)

Recommended citation
Christian, T. & Coles, P. (2022), 'Morus 'Black Tabor'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/morus/morus-black-tabor/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Morus nigra 'Black Tabor'

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

Credits

Tom Christian & Peter Coles (2022)

Recommended citation
Christian, T. & Coles, P. (2022), 'Morus 'Black Tabor'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/morus/morus-black-tabor/). Accessed 2022-09-28.

‘Black Tabor’ originated as scion material sent from Israel to the Natural History Museum, Paris in 1967. It forms a small to medium-sized tree of moderate growth, with relatively large, sweet, fruits and has been commercially available in Europe since at least the early 1990s (Andrews, Feltwell & Lane 2012). Originally sent out as a named M. nigra selection, other authors have considered it to belong to ‘M. alba or a hybrid between M. alba and M. rubra’ (Andrews, Feltwell & Lane 2012); the latter option, M. alba × M. rubra, seems unlikely given what is known of its origin, and confusion between M. alba and M. nigra is also unlikely. Given the uncertainty we have opted to treat it as a stand alone cultivar.