Morus kagayamae Koidz.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Morus kagayamae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/morus/morus-kagayamae/). Accessed 2021-12-08.

Genus

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
caudate
With a long tail-like appendage.
dentate
With evenly triangular teeth at the edge. (Cf. crenate teeth rounded; serrate teeth saw-like.)
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Morus kagayamae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/morus/morus-kagayamae/). Accessed 2021-12-08.

A small tree up to 50 ft high, with smooth, polished, glabrous young branchlets. Leaves ovate to wide-ovate, acuminate to caudate at the apex, 134 to 314 in. long, 138 to 238 in. wide (larger on strong shoots), coarsely and irregularly dentate, sometimes with one or two short lobes on each side, papery in texture, glabrous, upper surface rich deep green, lower surface light green. Female flowers densely crowded in a cylindrical spike about 38 in. long, which is bare of flowers along a narrow strip down one side. Fruits said to be black.

A native of Japan in the small islands of Hachijo and Miyake of the Izu-No- Shichito chain, south of the main island. It is closely allied to M. australis, but seems distinct enough to rank as a species, differing in the glabrous, coarsely dentate leaves and the peculiarity of the female inflorescence noted above. According to Wilson, who collected it on Hachijo in April 1917 (No. 8373), it grows wild there and is also much cultivated for feeding silkworms. A tree at Kew, whose leaves usually colour bright yellow in the autumn, was almost certainly raised from seeds collected by Wilson.