Myrsine chathamica F. v. Muell.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Myrsine chathamica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/myrsine/myrsine-chathamica/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Rapanea chathamica (F. v. Muell.) W. R. B. Oliver
  • Suttonia chathamica (F. v. Muell.) Mez

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
unisexual
Having only male or female organs in a flower.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Myrsine chathamica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/myrsine/myrsine-chathamica/). Accessed 2021-11-30.

A small evergreen tree up to 20 ft high; young shoots furnished with short, stiff hairs. Leaves alternate, leathery, obovate, notched at the rounded apex, tapered at the base, not toothed, 1 to 212 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, glabrous except for down along the midrib beneath, pale green on both surfaces, dotted with glands beneath; stalk 16 in. or so long. Flowers 110 in. wide, unisexual, produced in dense clusters in the leaf-axils and on the lower naked part of the shoot; petals four, ciliate, thickly dotted with reddish glands. Fruits globose, purplish, 14 to 13 in. wide, containing one seed.

Native of the Chatham Islands (New Zealand); introduced by Major A. A. Dorrien-Smith, who visited the islands in December 1909 and found it common there in certain woods. One of its companion trees, then in full bloom, was Hebe gigantea, 20 ft high. The myrsine – inconspicuous in its flowers – should succeed where Olearia semidentata, perhaps the most beautiful of Chatham Island shrubs, succeeds.