Picea smithiana (Wall.) Boiss.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Picea smithiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/picea/picea-smithiana/). Accessed 2019-12-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Pinus smithiana Wall.
  • Picea morinda Link
  • Abies khutrow Loud.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
entire
With an unbroken margin.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Picea smithiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/picea/picea-smithiana/). Accessed 2019-12-05.

A tree 100 to 120, sometimes 200 ft high, with horizontal branches, but perfectly pendulous branchlets; young shoots stiff, pale grey, shining, not downy; buds conical, often resinous, up to 12 in. long. Leaves arranged all round the twigs (rather more thinly beneath), standing out at an angle of about 60°; they are quadrangular, rigid, needle-like, with prickly points, 112 in. long, often slightly curved, green with a few stomatic lines on each of the four faces. Cones cylindrical, tapered towards the apex, 4 to 7 in. long, 112 to 2 in. wide, brown when mature; scales broadly rounded and entire at the margin.

Native of the W. Himalaya; introduced to Scotland in 1818 by Dr Govan of Cupar, who received cones from his son in India, which he gave to the Earl of Hopetoun; it is named after Sir James Smith, first President of the Linnean Society. It is distinct from the other spruces in the great length of leaf, and is also one of the most striking from the weeping character of its branchlets, which, perhaps, give it a somewhat funereal aspect. It is subject to injury by spring frost especially in the young state, and will thrive best in a situation shaded from early morning sun. It likes a moist, loamy soil.

An original tree still grows at Hopetoun in West Lothian, Scotland; it measures 90 × 1012 ft (1971), and there are several others in Scotland, slightly younger and of about the same size. A fine example at Taymouth Castle, Perths., measures 112 × 1314 ft (1974). Some of the largest in southern Britain are: Cuffnels, Lyndhurst, Hants, 118 × 1014 ft and 113 × 11 ft (1970); Melbury, Dorset, 108 × 1214 and 111 × 1114 ft (1970); Bicton, Devon, 107 × 1014 ft (1968); Redleaf, Kent, 99 × 1014 ft (1963); West Dean, Sussex, 105 × 9 ft (1973); Bowood, Wilts, 105 × 1114 ft and 106 × 1012 ft (1968); Boconnoc, Cornwall, 100 × 12 ft (1970); Nettlecombe, Somerset, 100 × 9 ft (1971); Bolderwood, New Forest, 111 × 812 ft (1970).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: West Dean, Sussex, 105 × 834 ft (1980); Cuffnells, Lyndhurst, Hants, 124 × 1112 ft and 124 × 1012 ft (1980); Bolderwood, Lyndhurst, Hants, pl. 1860, 111 × 812 ft (1970); Melbury, Dorset, the tree mentioned has been blown down, but another is 124 × 1012 ft (1980); Bowood, Wilts., three trees, the largest 108 × 12 ft (1984); Eastnor Castle, Heref., 105 × 11 ft (1984); Whitfield House, Heref., 115 × 834 ft (1984); Nettlecombe, Som., 111 × 10 ft (1984); Boconnoc, Cornwall, this tree has died; Hopetoun Castle, West Lothian, original introduction, 10 × 1012 ft (1984); Keir House, Perths., 105 × 1012 ft (1985); Methven Castle, Perths., 82 × 1314 ft (1985); Taymouth Castle, Perths., 121 × 14 ft (1983); Fairburn Castle, Ross, 85 × 14 ft (1982); Ballywalter, Co. Down, 62 × 1134 ft (1982); Caledon, Co. Tyrone, 118 × 1012 ft (1983).


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