Quercus acherdophylla Trel.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus acherdophylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-acherdophylla/). Accessed 21-6-2019.

Genus

  • Quercus
  • Subgen. Quercus, Sect. Lobatae

Other species in genus

Glossary

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus acherdophylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-acherdophylla/). Accessed 21-6-2019.

Tree to 15 m. Bark greenish grey and smooth when young. Branchlets stiff and slender, dull reddish brown with prominent white or brown lenticels. Leaves deciduous (to evergreen in cultivation), dark green, 6–7 × 2–3 cm, ovate, immature leaves with white and yellow stellate tomentum below; in the mature leaves the upper surface is glossy and glabrous but the lower surface retains some stellate tomentum, particularly along the midrib, 10–12 secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margins entire and slightly curled to undulate, lamina surface sometimes rather bullate, apex acute; petiole 0.2–0.4 cm long and largely glabrous. Infructescences 0.5 cm long with one to two cupules. Cupule saucer-shaped, to 1 cm diameter; scales brown, blunt and appressed. Acorn ovoid, with half of its length enclosed in the cupule, ~1.4 cm long. Flowering April (Mexico). Trelease 1924. Distribution MEXICO: Hidalgo, Puebla, Veracruz. Habitat Between 2400 and 2500 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Not evaluated.

One of the darkleaved Mexican species, Quercus acherdophylla appears to have first been introduced by Michael Frankis in 1991 (under several MPF collection numbers: M. Frankis, pers. comm. 2006), with later collections by Allen Coombes in 1995 (no. 246) and L.R. Santamaria in 1996. Trees from these early introductions are growing well at the Hillier Gardens and at Chevithorne Barton, where the tallest is approximately 14 m (in 2008) and seems to be completely hardy. This is not a particularly attractive species, the sparsely clad long new shoots in late summer giving it an untidy look, and branches from the base can be heavy.

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