Quercus aucheri Jaub. & Spach

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus aucheri' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-aucheri/). Accessed 2019-08-19.

Genus

  • Quercus
  • Subgen. Quercus, Sect. Cerris

Other species in genus

Glossary

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus aucheri' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-aucheri/). Accessed 2019-08-19.

Shrub or tree to 10 m. Branchlets somewhat pendulous, yellowish brown, densely stellate-tomentose. Leaves evergreen, leathery, 0.9–4 × 0.9–2.5 cm, broadly oblong to ovate, upper surface glabrous or with inconspicuous tomentum, lower surface grey-white with stellate tomentum, five to nine secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margins entire or serrate, apex rounded; serrate leaves occur on sterile long shoots, entire leaves on short shoots and older shoots; petiole absent or to 0.6 cm long. Cupule cup-shaped, sessile, to 2.5 cm diameter; scales ovate to lanceolate, appressed, pubescent. Acorn with one-third of its length enclosed in the cupule, apex flattened to acute; mature in second year. Browicz 1986, Hedge & Yaltirik 1994. Distribution GREECE: eastern Aegean islands; TURKEY: southwestern Anatolia. Habitat Maquis on limestone slopes, between 0 and 450 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 8. Conservation status Near Threatened. Illustration Browicz 1986; NT708. Cross-reference S407. Taxonomic note This species is closely related to Q. coccifera, which has largely glabrous leaves and a cupule 1–2 cm diameter.

Despite its origins in a botanically well-known part of the world, Quercus aucheri has not received much attention from dendrologists, perhaps because of its similarity to the widespread Q. coccifera. Recent introductions are now established in cultivation, with small trees in major collections. At the Hillier Gardens it has proved to be slow-growing, saplings from a 1999 Turkish collection ranging in height from 30 to 100 cm in 2006 (Sir Harold Hillier Gardens database), although the tallest has now reached 1.7 m (A. Coombes, pers. comm. 2008). As a drought-adapted Mediterranean species, it should be planted in full sun in a warm site.


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