Quercus crassipes Humb. & Bonpl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus crassipes' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-crassipes/). Accessed 2019-10-18.

Genus

Other species in genus

Glossary

acorn
Fruit of Quercus; a single-seeded nut set in a woody cupule.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
authority
The author(s) of a plant name. The names of these authors are stated directly after the plant name often abbreviated. For example Quercus L. (L. = Carl Linnaeus); Rhus wallichii Hook. f. (Hook. f. = Joseph Hooker filius i.e. son of William Hooker). Standard reference for the abbreviations: Brummitt & Powell (1992).
cordate
Heart-shaped (i.e. with two equal lobes at the base).
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
obtuse
Blunt.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
tomentum
Dense layer of soft hairs. tomentose With tomentum.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus crassipes' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-crassipes/). Accessed 2019-10-18.

A medium-sized evergreen tree; branchlets densely downy; buds very small. Leaves leathery, oblong-elliptic, broadest slightly below the middle, obtuse to subacute and usually mucronate at the apex, rounded to slightly cordate at the base, 2 to 312 in. long, rarely over 1 in. wide, glabrous above when mature, clad beneath with a close tomentum which only gradually wears away, margins entire or slightly undulated; petiole up to 14 in. long. Fruits ripening in the second year, solitary or in pairs, on short stalks; acorn ovoid, enclosed in its lower half by a top-shaped cup 12 to 34 in. wide, with appressed, ovate, slightly downy scales.

Native of Mexico; introduced by Hartweg in 1839 for the Horticultural Society. Although now scarcely known in cultivation, this seems to be one of the hardier of the Mexican oaks. A tree at Carclew in Cornwall, possibly from the original introduction, measured 64 × 514 ft in 1908 and was still alive in 1933. Trelease, the American authority on the oaks, thought that the Carclew tree was Q. mexicana Humb. & Bonpl., but this species and Q. crassipes are very closely allied and distinguishable only by their fruits, which were not borne by the Carclew tree.


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