Quercus frainetto Ten.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus frainetto' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-frainetto/). Accessed 21-6-2019.

Genus

Common Names

  • Hungarian Oak
  • Farnetto

Synonyms

  • Q. farnetto Ten.
  • Q. conferta Kit.
  • Q. esculus L., in part, nom. ambig.

Other species in genus

Glossary

acorn
Fruit of Quercus; a single-seeded nut set in a woody cupule.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus frainetto' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-frainetto/). Accessed 21-6-2019.

A deciduous tree of stately habit, up to 100 ft high in the wild; young shoots slightly downy, glabrous and grey the second year. Leaves obovate, but deeply cut into six to ten oblong lobes at each side, the largest of which are 2 in. deep, and penetrate from half to three quarters of the distance towards the midrib; they frequently have two to five rounded teeth on one or both sides. The largest leaves are 6 to 8 in. long, and 3 to 412 in. wide; the smallest about half those dimensions, all tapering at the base to a short stalk 13 in. or less long, the blade usually prolonged at each side into a pair of short auricles. The upper surface is dark green and soon becomes glabrous, the lower one downy, and greyish green. Fruits 12 to 34 in. long, scarcely stalked, produced two to four together, the lower half of the acorn enclosed by the cup, which is clothed outside with flattened downy scales.

Native of S. Italy, the Balkans, Rumania, and parts of Hungary; introduced about 1837. It is one of the handsomest of all oaks of the sessile-flowered group, and thrives well in cultivation. It is only likely to be confused with Q. macranthera, a species very distinct, nevertheless, in its woolly shoots and in its buds with long, persistent stipules. Occasional crops of acorns are produced on cultivated trees.

At Kew the oldest specimen of the Hungarian oak is a grafted one, planted about 1840 and measuring 70 × 1114 ft (1971); in the Pagoda Vista there is a pair of trees received from the Knap Hill Nursery in 1893, also grafted, the larger of which measures 67 × 10 ft (1965). Other notable specimens are: Osterley Park, London, 75 × 1014 ft with a bole of 40 ft, and another 77 × 1034 ft (1965); Syon Park, London, 75 × 1114 ft (1967); Grayswood Hill, Surrey, 70 × 1034 ft (1971); Brook House, Ardingly, Sussex, 60 × 11 ft (1973); Woburn, Beds., 60 × 1114 ft (1962); Stratfield Saye, Hants, 85 × 1012 ft (1968); Westonbirt, Glos., in the Park 70 × 1114 ft (1966), in Main Drive, 85 × 912 ft (1970); Tortworth, Glos., 90 × 1012 ft (1964); Munden, Herts, pl. 1885, 85 × 914 ft (1968); Edinburgh Botanic Garden, pl. c. 1856, moved 1865, 67 × 8 ft (1967),

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Kew, pl. c. 1840, 74 × 1112 ft (1975) and, in Pagoda Vista, 75 × 1212 ft (1984); Osterley Park, London, 102 × 1134 ft, with a 40 ft bole, and 98 × 1112 ft (1982); Syon Park, London, 105 × 1314 ft (1982); Avenue House, Barnet, London, 77 × 1212 ft (1983); Grayswood Hill, Haslemere, Surrey, 82 × 1134 ft (1982); Brook House, Ardingly, Sussex, 60 × 11 ft (1973); Woburn, Beds., 71 × 12 ft (1977); Stratfield Saye, Hants, 101 × 1234 ft and 115 × 11 ft (1982); Westonbirt, Glos., in the Park, 71 × 1234 ft (1982); Tortworth, Glos., 85 × 12 ft (1978); Holker, Lancs., 98 × 1334 ft (1983); Edinburgh Botanic Garden, 76 × 8 ft (1981); Dalmeny House, W. Lothian, 77 × 1012 ft (1984); Carberry Tower, E. Lothian, 102 × 1314 ft, a fine tree (1985); Cortachy Castle, Angus, pl. 1897, 82 × 912 ft (1981); Camperdown Park, near Dundee, 108 × 11 ft (1985); National Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, Eire, 71 × 1114 ft (1975).

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