Quercus hispanica Lam.

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Credits

Allen Coombes & Roderick Cameron (2021)

Recommended citation
Coombes, A. & Cameron, R. (2021), 'Quercus hispanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-hispanica/). Accessed 2021-12-01.

Genus

  • Quercus
  • Subgen. Cerris, Sect. Cerris

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

Credits

Allen Coombes & Roderick Cameron (2021)

Recommended citation
Coombes, A. & Cameron, R. (2021), 'Quercus hispanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-hispanica/). Accessed 2021-12-01.

Conservation status Not evaluated (NE)

When Lamarck (1785) described Quercus hispanica he listed three varieties, all from plants cultivated in the Jardin royal de Trianon at Versailles. The first he called ‘the Gibraltar oak’. This was said to be found around Gibraltar and made a more beautiful tree than the cork oak (Q. suber) with somewhat similar bark. The second, ‘the oak with Aegylops leaves’, was apparently from a tree given by French botanist Jussieu said to have come from Spain – Vazquez Pardo et al. (2018) regard this as Q. faginea. The third he called ‘Le Chêne turnère’. This was raised in England before 1780 and was named Q. × turneri by Willdenow in 1809 from a tree in Berlin. Judging from a specimen in the Lamarck herbarium, the tree he referred to was not ‘Pseudoturneri’ but was very similar to the Berlin tree and to ‘Spencer Turner’.

Therefore Q. hispanica, as described, consisted of three different taxa. Cristofolini et al. (2017) lectotypified the name with the specimen of the Gibraltar oak. The identity of this is currently uncertain, but it could be a hybrid between Q. cerris and Q. suber.

For plants commonly grown under this name see Q. × crenata.