Quercus hypoleucoides Camus

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus hypoleucoides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-hypoleucoides/). Accessed 2019-12-15.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Q. hypoleuca Engelm., not Miq.

Other species in genus

Glossary

acute
Sharply pointed.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
obtuse
Blunt.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
stellate
Star-shaped.
tomentum
Dense layer of soft hairs. tomentose With tomentum.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus hypoleucoides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-hypoleucoides/). Accessed 2019-12-15.

An almost evergreen tree usually 20 to 30 ft high, occasionally taller; young stems grey tomentose, slowly becoming glabrous and reddish brown. Leaves persisting for a year or slightly more, lanceolate to elliptic, tapered at the apex to an acute point, 2 to 4 in. long, up to 1 in. wide, upper surface at first covered with whitish or greyish stellate hairs, becoming glabrous, dark green and lustrous, lower surface with a persistent dense white or grey tomentum, margins usually entire, sometimes undulately toothed or even faintly spine-toothed; petiole about 12 in. long. Fruits usually solitary, sessile or shortly stalked; acorns ovoid-conic, 12 to 38 in. long, one-third enclosed in a thick hemispherical cup downy on the inside, covered with appressed, obtuse, downy scales.

Native of the south-western USA, where, according to Sargent, it occurs on slopes of cañons and on high ridges at 6,000 to 7,000 ft. Of recent introduction.


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