Quercus longinux Hayata

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus longinux' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-longinux/). Accessed 2019-10-15.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Cyclobalanopsis longinux (Hayata) Schottky

Other species in genus

Glossary

References

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus longinux' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-longinux/). Accessed 2019-10-15.

Shrub or tree to 15 m. Branchlets glabrous, with oblong lenticels. Leaves evergreen, 6–8 × 2–2.5 cm, lanceolate to oblong, upper surface bright green, lower surface farinose or with simple hairs, seven to nine secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margins upper half serrate, apex acuminate to caudate; petiole 1–2 cm long and glabrous. Cupule bowl-shaped, 0.8 × 1–1.2 cm, outside greyish brown-tomentose; scales in six to ten rings. Acorn ellipsoid to ovoid, with about half of its length enclosed in the cupule, 1.7–2.2 cm long. stylopodium short but persistent. Flowering March to May, fruiting September to November (Taiwan). Liao 1996a, Huang et al. 1999, Menitsky 2005. Distribution TAIWAN. Habitat Broadleaved evergreen forest between 300 and 2500 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 9. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration Liao 1996a, Huang et al. 1999, Menitsky 2005. Taxonomic note Menitsky (2005) considers this taxon a subspecies of Q. glauca Thunb. The varieties of Q. longinux recognised by Liao (1996a) are not recognised in Flora of China (Huang et al. 1999) or the Fagales Checklist (Govaerts & Frodin 1998).

The only older plants of Quercus longinux known in cultivation at present are at Tregrehan, grown from acorns collected by Tom Hudson in 1989 and now 3 m tall. As with so many of these newly introduced oaks, flowering and fruiting are needed to confirm their identity. It was also collected in Taiwan by Allen Coombes in 2003.


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