Quercus morii Hayata

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus morii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-morii/). Accessed 2019-10-15.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Cyclobalanopsis morii (Hayata) Schottky

Other species in genus

Glossary

endemic
(of a plant or an animal) Found in a native state only within a defined region or country.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus morii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-morii/). Accessed 2019-10-15.

Tree to 30 m, 1 m dbh. Bark reddish brown and scaly. Branchlets thick and glabrous or with web-like hairs when young; lenticels conspicuous. Leaves evergreen, 6–10 × 2.5–4 cm, oblong to obovate, glabrous or covered with silky hairs when young, 8–11 secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margins upper half serrate, apex caudate; petiole 1.5–3 cm long and glabrous. Infructescence 2–3 cm long with one to two cupules. Cupule cup-shaped to campanulate, 1.4–1.8 × 1.5–2 cm, outside brown-pubescent, inside brown-tomentose; scales in seven to eight rings. Acorn ovoid to cylindrical, with about half of its length enclosed in the cupule, 1.5–2.5 cm long, stylopodium persistent. Flowering April to May, fruiting October to November of the following year (Taiwan). Liao 1996, Huang et al. 1999, Menitsky 2005. Distribution TAIWAN. Habitat Broadleaved evergreen forest between 750 and 2600 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 9. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration Liao 1996a, Huang et al. 1999; NT698, NT739.

This Taiwanese endemic oak was first introduced by the Edinburgh Taiwan Expedition of 1993 (under ETE 11), but it may not have become established: there are none at any of the Scottish botanic gardens, and one from this introduction at the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens has proved to be Quercus glauca. Allen Coombes gathered acorns in Taiwan in 2003 and distributed material to other collections. At the Hillier Gardens the seedlings have grown very slowly and have not yet been planted (A. Coombes, pers. comm. 2006). This contrasts with the situation at Tregrehan, where a seedling grown from acorns supplied by the Taiwan Forestry Department has grown 2 m within the first two years after planting in 2004 (T. Hudson, pers. comm. 2006).


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