Quercus trojana Webb

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus trojana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-trojana/). Accessed 2019-11-17.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Q. macedonica A. DC.

Other species in genus

Glossary

acorn
Fruit of Quercus; a single-seeded nut set in a woody cupule.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
stellate
Star-shaped.
truncate
Appearing as if cut off.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Quercus trojana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-trojana/). Accessed 2019-11-17.

A small semi-evergreen tree of slender, pyramidal habit when young; branchlets dull and grey, furnished at first with stellate scurf. Leaves ovate-oblong, slightly heart-shaped at the base, taper-pointed, with nine to twelve parallel veins either side the midrib, each terminating at the apex of a comparatively large, incurved, triangular mucronate tooth, 114 to 234 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide, shining with a rather metallic lustre above, duller beneath; both surfaces quite glabrous by the time the leaf is fully grown; stalk 18 in. or less long. Fruits usually solitary, scarcely stalked, 34 to 114 in. long; acorn truncate; middle scales of cup recurved, the upper ones upright or incurved.

Native of S.E. Italy (Apulia), the western Balkans, and also found in one restricted area in W. Anatolia; introduced to Kew in 1890. A very distinct oak, rather stiff in habit and retaining its leaves until December or later. It is very hardy, and I have never seen it injured by frost. As described, this oak resembles Q, libani, but it is really a much stiffer tree, the leaves are shorter and greyer green, and both they and the fruits are much shorter stalked.

There are several examples of this species at Kew, the largest, pl. 1904, measuring 62 × 534 ft (1972). Others are: Edinburgh Botanic Garden, pl. 1905, 38 × 414 ft (1967); Batsford Park, Glos., 66 × 18 ft (1971); Hergest Croft, Heref., pl. 1911, 45 × 334 ft (1961); Wakehurst Place, Sussex, 45 × 4 ft (1965).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Kew, pl. 1904, 63 × 534 ft (1986); Batsford Park, Glos., 80 × 834 ft (1983) (girth misprinted as 18 ft on page 516); Tortworth, Glos., 80 × 712 ft (1975); Edinburgh Botanic Garden, 59 × 534 ft (1985).


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